ZedBoard Part 4 Configuration

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If you read this mini-series, you know that I have reached the stage where I have a simple Hello World program running on my Zynq when it is connected to the software development kit. In reality, however, this is not much good. For a real-world use model, we will want to store our software program and configuration bitstream in nonvolatile memory and configure the device following power-on.

But how do we do this? For those used to a traditional FPGA development and configuration flow, this is a little different from what one might initially imagine. In fact, it will take me a couple of blogs to explain it all, but I promise this will be worthwhile, so please bear with me.

Before I jump into the tools and processes you need to follow to create the boot file, I had better explain the basics of the Zynq configuration. In a Zynq system, the processing system is the master and always configures the programmable logic side of things, unless the JTAG interface is used. This means that the processing system can be powered and operating while the programmable logic remains unpowered (unless secure configuration is used).

The processing system therefore follows a typical processor boot sequence, initially running from an internal nonmodifiable boot PROM. This boot PROM contains drivers for the supported nonvolatile memories, along with drivers for the programmable logic configuration. The boot PROM also loads in the next stage of the boot loader, the first stage boot loader (FSBL), which is user-provided. The FSBL can then configure the DDR memory and other peripherals on the processor before loading the software application and configuring the programmable logic (if desired) using the processor configuration access port. The PCAP allows both partial and full configuration of the programmable logic.  This means the programmable logic can be programed at any time once the processing system is up and running. Also, the configuration can be read back and checked for errors.

The Zynq supports both secure and nonsecure methods of configuration. In the case of secure configuration, the programmable logic section of the device must be powered up as the hard macro. The advanced encryption standard and secure hash algorithm needed for decryption are located within the programmable logic side of the device.

The Zynq processing system can be configured via a number of different nonvolatile memories (Quad SPI Flash, NAND Flash, NOR Flash, or SD). The system can also be configured via JTAG, just like any other device. Like all other FPGAs from Xilinx (this site’s sponsor), the Zynq uses a number of mode pins to determine crucial system settings like the type of memory where the program is stored. These mode pins share the multiuse input/output pins on the processor system side of the device. In all, there are seven mode pins mapped to MIO[8:2]. The first four define the boot mode. The fifth defines whether the PLL is used, and the other two define the voltages on MIO bank 0 and bank 1 during power-up.

The FSBL can change the voltage standard defined on MIO bank 0 and 1 to the correct standard. However, if you are designing a system from scratch, you must ensure that the voltage used during power-up cannot damage the device connected to these pins.

On the ZedBoards, these mode pins can be changed via jumpers to facilitate configuration from the SD, JTAG, or Quad SPI memories that are available.

In my next blog, I will explain how we use the tools to generate the first stage boot loader and then tie everything together to generate the file required to program the Zynq.

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