Hardware Considerations – Power Architectures Part One

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One of the more interesting aspects to start looking at is the power architecture of a design, and how we go about powering FPGA’s (and other devices) on the board. Normally the system will have an intermediate voltage which comes from an AC/DC convertor or other DC supply which powers the system. The first stage of the design is to correctly specify this interface in terms of voltage and current required by the design. Determining this intermediate voltage is the easier task of the two, as the current required will have to take into account the downstream convertor efficiencies.

The first stage in defining power architecture is the determination of all the voltage rails and currents drawn by each of these rails. For example when considering a FPGA based imaging system as shown below you may have a number of voltage rails

pwr1

For this example all of the power supplies have a requirement to be within +/-5%.

pwr2

As can be seen from the table above the highest voltage required is 3.465V which is the 3.3V at its maximum acceptable tolerance. Knowing this value allows us to determine the voltage supplied by the AC/DC or other DC supply within the system, the sensible thing to do here is to select a convertor which has an output compatible with the 3.3V required and save a conversion stage (increasing the overall efficiency).

The next stage is to determine the power required by each of the rails. The requires that you use power estimation tools such as Xilinx XPE and read the datasheets for other devices to ensure you can determine the power required, I tend to collate all of this in a spread sheet as this comes in useful later on once we are determining the conversion architectures.

pwr3

As you can see above when I have calculated the power required by the board I have performed two calculations the nominal and the maximum power, this is because at this point in time I have not calculated the maximum rail voltages provided in the worse case by the convertors therefore I have assumed they will be at maximum voltage. This is important as it is needed to determine the power required in the worse case by the AC/DC convertor (You should always design to address worse case requirements) while the difference above 146.5 mW is not large it could be in a larger system.

However having determined the load power we need to determine the overall power required including loses in the power convertors before we can specify the power required from the AC/DC convertor or DC Supply.

Having determined the power required by each device the next step is to determine the power required by each rail, this can then be used to determine the conversion architecture, although of course other requirements also come into play to determine this.

pwr4
Regarding power architecture there are two main types of convertors

Switching regulators, generate the regulated output voltage by switching storage inductors into and out of the circuit to maintain a regulated output voltage when this switching is controlled via either an analogue or digital control loop. With a switching regulator theoretically 100% efficiency is achievable, however sadly the real world intervenes as components are not ideal however efficiencies greater than 90% can be achieved and GAN FET’s promise even better performance.

Linear Regulators generate the regulated voltage by dissipating the excess power across the pass transistor. This is dissipation is controlled via a control loop to adjust for fluctuations, as there is no switching involved the LR is often used where quieter power supplies are required however that does not mean all ripple on the voltage rail is rejected. As can be seen in the image below as the frequency increases the ripple rejection decreases.

pwr5

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