Tag Archives: Algorithms

A Recipe for Embedded Systems

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

sw3

One thing that is always important for engineers, is the need for us to deliver our projects on quality, schedule and budget. When it comes to developing embedded systems there are a number of lessons, learnt by embedded system developers over the years which can be used to ensure your embedded system achieves these. Let us explore some of the most important lessons learned in developing these.

Link – Page34

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Calculating Mathematically Complex Functions Issue 87

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

xilinx87_2

Thanks to their flexibility and performance,
FPGAs have found
their way into a number of industrial,
science, military and other
applications that require the calculation
of complex mathematical problems
or transfer functions. It is not uncommon to
see tight accuracy and calculation latency
times in the more critical applications.
When using an FPGA to implement mathematical
functions, engineers normally
choose fixed-point mathematics (see Xcell
Journal issue 80, “The Basics of FPGA
Mathematics,” http://issuu.com/xcelljournal/
docs/xcell80/44?e=2232228/2002872).
Also, there are many algorithms, such as
CORDIC, that you can use to calculate transcendental
functions (see Xcell Journal issue
79, “How to Use the CORDIC Algorithm
in Your FPGA,” http://www.xilinx.com/
publications/archives/xcel l/Xcell79.pdf).
However, when confronting functions that
are very mathematically complex, there are
more efficient ways of dealing with them than
by implementing the exact demanding function
within the FPGA. To understand these
alternative approaches—especially one of
them, polynomial approximation—let us first
define the problem.

Link here

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How to Build a Better Dc/Dc Regulator Using FPGA’s Issue 77

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

xilinx77Designers traditionally build switchmode
DC/DC converters using analog
components (bespoke ICs, operational
amplifiers, resistors, capacitors and
the like) to control the feedback loop
and to generate the pulse-width modulation
required for switching. When
using analog components like these,
you must consider a number of factors,
taking tolerances, electrical
stresses, aging drift and temperature
drift into account to ensure the stability
of the design. Now, the availability
of affordable low-powered FPGAs
coupled with analog-to-digital converters
allows the FPGA to replace the traditional
analog approach.

Link here

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail