Tag Archives: Prototyping

A Recipe for Embedded Systems

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sw3

One thing that is always important for engineers, is the need for us to deliver our projects on quality, schedule and budget. When it comes to developing embedded systems there are a number of lessons, learnt by embedded system developers over the years which can be used to ensure your embedded system achieves these. Let us explore some of the most important lessons learned in developing these.

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More things to consider for your prototype

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Three things to consider for your prototyping

One of the most exciting stages of an engineering project is when the hardware arrives in the lab for the first time ready for commissioning before integration testing. This typically can mean long hours for all the engineers on the project so how can we try and reduce this time and minimize the issues which may arise.

  1. Think how you will test it from day one – All engineers know the cost of implementing fixes increases as the development progresses. It is more expensive to fix a pin out error once the design has been fixed and manufactured than during an early design review for example. This is the same for testing, thinking of how you will test it from day one and what test equipment you might need.
  2. Think about what to include in the design – During the design of the hardware several design features and functions may need to be included to allow testing of the board with greater ease. The most simple and often implemented test provision is placing test points on all voltage rails Being able to monitor the outputs of clocks and resets is also important, for this reason it is good practice to place test points on the reset line and correctly terminate an unused clock buffer and add test points allowing the clock to be probed with ease. Many modern high performance devices also have on die temperature diodes which can be used during your testing to determine the junction temperature of the die is acceptable, provided you can access these points.
  3. Simple RTL – If you have a complicated design at both the hardware and FPGA level it can be best to develop a more simplified cut down version of the RTL to aid in the testing of the board and the interface between the FPGA and the peripheral. This is especially the case if you are designing high speed interfaces. This cut down RTL could be used in conjunction with chip scope to capture data and block rams which have been pre loaded with data patterns to act as stimulus. This can especially be the case when using ADCs and DACs connected to a FPGA the reprogrammable nature of the FPGA should be utilized to the maximum to develop designs which will allow parametric testing of the ADC and DAC for instance Noise Power Ratio, Spurious Free Dynamic Range and effective number of bit calculations. You should also aim to capitalize on the resources provided by the FPGA  especially system monitor and XADC which can be very useful for monitoring the voltage rails on die and hence helping verify the power integrity analysis

What if it does not go to plan? The first thing to do is not panic, for many issues you will probably not be the first person to face this issue(s) though it may feel like it. Revisit the design schematics, layout and read the data sheets and any errata’s again also have a look on some of the very helpful websites like All Programmable Planet or the Xilinx Forums there are plenty of helpful ones out there.

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Things to consider for your prototype

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One the most exciting, fun and terrifying stages of engineering is when the first prototypes or engineering models arrive in the lab and are ready for testing. You will have been planning for this day for a long time (hopefully) as the cost of identifying and correcting errors later on in the production run only increases.

Planning for this day will have started right back at the concept of the design as you considered how you would test the functionality being designed into the hardware, FPGA and processors etc. Ensuring you have provided sufficient test points and protected them appropriately (you would hate to short out a rail as you tried to measure the voltage). One thing you also need to consider is accessibility of these test points and debug headers to ensure you can actually access them. Another aspect to consider is how you can test the board on its own will you need any special to type test equipment to enable you to test it, when will it be available.

You will also need to compile a test plan to detail everything you intend to test and the expected results otherwise how else can you be expected to know if performs as required or not.

Once you get the hardware in the lab the testing is generally split into two sections the section is checking the hardware integrity i.e. can it be powered on safely and is it suitable for further testing. During this stage you will check the board has been manufactured and populated correctly, that the voltage rails are safe to turn on and then will come the moment of truth when you have to apply power to the board for the first time. This is always a nerve wracking moment…

Once you have applied power you will be looking at the current drawn against your projections, are the clocks at the correct frequency, does the protection circuitry (over voltage / under voltage) resets and sequencing function as desired. This is the basic engineering tests that will be your first priority however; you will soon progress to wanting to test the more complex interfaces and then the performance.

Some of these may be able to be tested via JTAG / Boundary scan however it is only really testing at speed that you can relax a little (you can never truly relax even after all the qualification testing) It is therefore a great idea to have developed some simple test code for your FPGA or microprocessor to prevent you having to debug both the FPGA/Microprocessor design and the board design. I am sure we have all spent many hours looking into is the issue with the board, FPGA, processor or even worse the ASIC.

Once you have completed the integrity checks you can then proceed to testing the functionality and working out what changes you need to make to the next iteration if any.

Of course at some point I am sure you will encounter problems the most important thing to remember at that point is to not panic and attempt to determine the root cause of the issue even if there is nothing you can do about it on the prototype.

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Six Aspects to consider designing your PCB

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pcbDesigning a PCB for current devices is a very complex and often over looked area instead focus falls upon the more interesting FPGA or Processors. However, the fact remains that without getting the board correct in the first place you may find you have issues either sooner or later so what are the main aspects of a modern PCB should we be concerned about.

  • PCB Stack up – the keystone of the entire PCB this defines the number of layers within the PCB (More layers can increase the cost) along with allowing the engineering team to establish the characteristic impedance on the required layers. This like many things in engineering becomes a trade-off between fabrication processes and layer count to achieve the reliability, yield and cost targets.
  • Via Types – Via’s enable interconnection between the layers and components however, there are many different types Through, Buried, Blind, and Micro (are these single layer, multi-layer or stacked). The best designs minimise the different types of via, close discussion with your selected PCB supplier is also important to ensure you’re via types are within their capabilities. You will also need to ensure the current carrying capacity of the different via types to ensure for high current paths you can parallel up.
  • Design Rules – These will address both rules for the design i.e. component placement, crosstalk budgets, layer allocation, length matching / time of flight analysis and so on. It will also include design for manufacture rules which ensure the finished design can actually be manufactured for instance are the via aspect rations correct.
  • Breakout strategy – before you can begin to verify your signal and power integrity you must first ensure you can break out and route all of the signals on high pin count devices. This will also affect the stack up of the PCB board for instance should you use micro via break out (most probably yes), how deep should these be is stacked micro via required. Once you have a defined stack for the PCB you can think of your routing strategy will it be the traditional North South East West, a layer based breakout or a hybrid style.
  • Signal Integrity – the most commonly considered aspects of designing a good PCB typically an engineer will consider aspect such as signal rise and fall times, track length and characteristic impedance, drive strength and slew rate of the driver and termination. To ensure the best performance SI simulations will be performed pre layout and post layout of the PCB, you will also need to consider the Cross talk budget.
  • Power Integrity – high performance devices especially modern FPGA and ASICs can require large currents at low voltages. Ensuring both the DC and AC performance of the power distribution network is of vital importance

Of course the list above is by no means complete however, it provides a good starting point

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Nuts and Bolts of Designing an FPGA into Your Hardware Issue 82

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ilinx82

To many engineers and project
managers, implementing
the functionality within an
FPGA and achieving timing
closure are the main areas of focus.
However, actually designing the FPGA
onto the printed-circuit board at the
hardware level can provide a number
of interesting challenges that you must
surmount for a successful design.

Link here

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